Bloopers / Unexpected / Imperfections / Nitpicking (OCD)

Disclaimer

This thread is about sharing what you heard so others can repeat this experience. This is about music and fun.

What to share?

Are you guys familiar with the 5W1H system? :stuck_out_tongue_closed_eyes:

  • WHAT exactly happened? E.g.: people walking in the studio; singer choking; wrong note, etc…
  • WHO performed the track? E.g.: song and artist.
  • WHERE this can be heard, i.e., in which album or URL?
  • WHEN this happened? The timestamp. E.g.: at 1’ 20".
  • WHY this caught your attention?
  • HOW did you notice? A specific gear was used?

I’m kidding. A simple sentence should do.

What to avoid

Pejorative comments in general.

Example

Still Got the Blues from Gary Moore (1990). One of my favorite solos from all times. There’s a small 10s window – starting from 5’ 20" – where there are a couple of (maybe) undesired notes. Every time I hear this song, I can’t un-notice. Any headphone should be able to reproduce this.

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Here are a couple of examples, both of which have to do with how the music was mixed and produced, not recorded (I think).

In some versions of Cannonball Adderley’s wonderful Somethin’ Else (from the legendary Blue Note album of the same name) there’s a sudden, disconcerting reduction in the background hiss in one channel at the 6:40-minute mark. It continues until ca. 7 minutes. For those of us old enough to have grown up with cassette players, it’s like someone depressed the Dolby noise reduction button and then released it 20 seconds later, albeit with the effect only being felt in one channel. The result is a muffled sound, with less air and sparkle. It upsets the recording’s balance and is intrusive enough, once you’ve heard it, to ruin the piece of music. Don’t worry, though: it’s not on every version that has been released. I haven’t checked enough versions yet to pin down the origin of it, and whether it’s on the original LP, but I first noticed it on my CD copy, which I believe is the original CD release. It’s not on the more recent remastered version. It’s audible enough that you can hear it with most any headphone setup; it’s easily discernible on youtube, although this example has it in the opposite channel to mine:

For the second example, on some versions of the classic song, Joshua Fit de Battle Of Jericho, from Grant Green’s outstanding Feelin’ The Spirit, the tambourine is too prominent in the mix—to the point where it detracts from the rest of the music and becomes the only thing I notice. This isn’t just OCD on my part - or, at least not entirely - as it’s not a problem on the remastered version (just the original digital release, I think). Arguably, my hearing is sensitive at this frequency, so it may not be such a problem for others. I hear it on my HD 6XX but it’s unbearable on my brighter Clear and HD 800 (I know, I know, some of you are probably curling up in the fetal position, whimpering at the horrifying prospect of listening to tambourines on an HD 800 - sorry for frightening you).

PS: some of the Blue Note remastered Rudy Van Gelder editions have been celebrated, others criticized, by audiophiles; I don’t have the experience to comment, really, suffice to say that it’s worth doing some homework before deciding whether to opt for the original or the remastered versions. And beware of some of Blue Note’s compilations; I’ve had one, on CD, that was markedly inferior to the original digital releases).

PPS: great idea for a thread! [edited for grammar and style]

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At the :32 second mark is the first time in this track that you hear Diana Krall make a ‘lip-smacking’ sound. The initial one is fairly quiet, but she does it repeatedly throughout the song and the others more audible.

Someone get her a glass of water!

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Sometimes I blow dry my hair so I can get to my headphones faster.

My boss went to a nearby Starbucks I happened to be sitting at for my break. He thought I was high when he saw me chilled out, drinking coffee with my eyes closed listening to the FH7.

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At the very beginning of “I Still Haven’t Found What I’m Looking For” by U2, there is about 2 seconds of quiet noises that sound unintentional. Hard to tell what they are, but I think any decent headphone should be able to pick it up if you listen closely. I noticed it because that song starts out so quietly and builds, and I love the way the tambourine sounds in the intro. I went specifically to listen to that and was surprised to catch those other noises at the start of the song.

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Probably ought to merge this topic with a prior thread:

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Haha. Right. Someone screw the left channel up. If you play in Mono, that part is much more subtle. Spot on.

Someone probably used a darker speaker/phone to mix this one. It is there. And it itches. lol

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Learned a new term today.

This happened a lot in my own recordings in low voice. I could never developed this technique. But it seems it also happen with professionals. :grimacing:

This one is really hard to “fix in the mix”. :smile:

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Looks like the drummer was still warming up.

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A classic: Mick not hitting the right note in the first line of Ruby Tuesday: “She would never say where she came from.”

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The intro of this song – you probably won’t pick up from YT video though – a HQ source may be required:

There’s a patterned high pitch while he plays – up to 30".

I suspect some high string is resonating and the amp is capturing that.

HD600 clearly captures this. It actually annoys the OCD listeners out there. :smile:


EDIT: I’m sharing a YT Music link: https://music.youtube.com/watch?v=j-dfrHkaXuE&feature=share

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Hi @Chrono, can you listen this at your end as well, since you also play guitar?

Spoiler alert: you’ll never un-hear this. :weary:

Yes hahaha I can hear it. My guess is that it’s some micrphonic artifacting from the guitar’s pickups.

Listening on the 58X btw :wink:

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Browsing recent releases I came across Laura Marling’s single, Held Down. She has an incredible voice, and it’s a great song. Notice the mic picks up her saying “yeah” or something like that right at the very beginning. I love it when musicians leave these blemishes in their songs.

Sharon Van Etten’s One Day is one of my favorite songs from the last few years. It’s really quite moving. And it’s funny that, at the end, she admits that “I did one flaw but I don’t remember where.” It’d take more OCD than I’ve got to find the “flaw,” if there even is one, and I never think to listen out for it when I play the song again as it’s so absorbing. Extra credit for anyone who can find it!

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Great songs. Liked the chord progression on the 2nd.

Something caught my attention at 31". I suspect she’s slightly out of pitch w.r.t. guitar. I may be wrong though. I was listening on “laid back” mode and that’s probably why that specific part has caught my attention. I’m far from perfect pitch either. On “focused” mode, I’d have missed everything. Including the melody. :smile:

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I think you’re right - now that you’ve pointed it out, I can hear something off at the 31’ mark.

That’s too funny! I do the same thing.

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Just found another one in “laid back” mode.

What’s Up by 4 Non Blondes at 20". Looks like a bar chord not well executed by the dude(or gal) in the acoustic guitar. If you listen carefully though, there are a lot of small execution issues on that instrument in the song. It gets easily masked by the singer though in most passages.

Man, heard this song so many times in my teenager days in the 90s. :smile:

Heard with the SRH1540.

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